The Pickleball Lab

 
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Video: The Speaking Dinker

Strong players pay attention not only to themselves and the ball, but to everyone on the court. It is important to know what is happening across the net as this may influence what kind of shot you hit and where you send it. This drill gives players an opportunity to pay attention two two things at once: the ball they are receiving, and the people on the other side of the net. We purposely didn’t add audio in this vid (although there are subtitles) so you can hear the communication.

Training Challenge: Dominant Deep Serves (Speed)

A deep serve makes it harder for returners to establish themselves at the non-volley zone. At a minimum it means they have farther to move in order to get there. In a previous version of this challenge, you were asked to play your deep serve using a high, slow serve that might give your opponents time to overthink before they hit the return. This time, try to hit that same deep target but with a fast and low serve.

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Goal: To be able to hit deep, fast serves that land within 5ft of the baseline.

Purpose: To develop a consistent serve that makes it difficult for the returner to do what they want with the ball.

Method: Place a pylon or other object 5ft from the baseline on both the odd and even courts. From the opposite baseline, serve a fast and low ball and attempt to land it between the pylon and baseline. Hit 10 serves from each court and record how many land in the target area.

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Equipment: A basket of balls or a partner who will send the ball back after it is served. Pylons or other objects.

Adaptations: Make the challenge harder by placing the pylon closer to the baseline. Make it easier by moving it farther from the baseline. Make the challenge harder by hitting the serve faster.

Notes: While this serve may challenge your consistency, it has a lot of upside. Giving your opponents less time to prepare will make it more likely that they hit a poor return that you can pounce on. Remember that you must still follow all serving rules.

Deep Serves (Speed)


Unwritten Rule: Missing on Purpose

By Mark Renneson

I was at a tournament not long ago, watching a PRO mixed doubles match. This was a refereed, early-round match featuring some of pickleball’s top players. I want to keep this anonymous so let’s say that Team 1 included Kim and Chris and Team 2 was Ricky and Ramona.

It was the first game in a best-two-out-of-three match and the score was 6-8-2. Chris was serving. After an intense point at the NVZ, Kim flicked the ball right through the middle past Ricky and Ramona. The ball was very close but was called out by the line judge on the baseline. Kim immediately protested and Ramona, looking briefly at her partner told the referee that, in fact, Kim’s shot hit the line and they should be awarded the point. Ramona was overruling the line judge’s call in favour of her opponent. Ramona was being a great sport. But the ref didn’t see it that way.

Players Vs. Referee

The referee refused to accept Ramona’s overrule. The line judge made the call and the ref was going to stick by it. The competitors looked confused: all four players agreed that the wrong call was made and that Kim and Chris should get to continue serving at 7-8-2, but the referee wasn’t going to overturn it. He awarded the sideout on the basis of his line judge’s call and he was done hearing any protests.

That’s when the player’s took matters into their own hands.

‘Let’s Go Around’

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Having been (unfairly) awarded the sideout, Ramona and Ricky were now in a great position to close out the first game. They just took the ball away from the other team’s second server, Chris, and were poised to go on a run. Especially with Chris and Kim still frazzled by the unfair call, the momentum was in Kim and Chris’s favour serving at 8-6-1.

But instead of serving right away, Ramona went over to Ricky and whispered something to him. She then looked at Chris and Kim and made a circling gesture with her finger. “Let’s go around” she said.

Ramona, remember, is one of the top players in the sport. She then proceeded to bury her serve in the bottom of the net. The crowd of 200 gasped. How could such a good player miss her serve so badly at this critical moment? She then handed the ball to her partner Ricky, who then hit the serve into the back fence on the fly.

The crowd was silent for a second, until one person started clapping. And then more. Next thing you knew, spectators were on their feet giving a standing ovation. I’m still not sure how many knew why they were cheering but nearly all of them were by the time Kim made it three in a row and missed her serve about 6 feet wide of the court.

What Happened?

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In the eyes of the players there was an injustice — a bad call led to a sideout rather than a point — and the referee wasn’t any help rectifying it. So with a quick glance and a twirl of the finger, the players solved the problem the best they knew how. Ramona and Ricky both dliberately missed their serves to give the ball back to Chris and Kim. Kim then missed her so that it went back to being the second server’s turn — as it was when all this began. The players ‘went around’ to restore the score again to 6-8-2.

What I liked about this event wasn’t just that order was restored, but that it was done without a lengthy discussion or conflict with the referee. There is an unspoken understanding with many high-clibre players that if you’re going to win, it ought to be fair. And if the refs make a mistake, the onus is on the players to make it right. Missing on purpose is one way to do that.

Analysis: Kyle Yates and the Lob of Glory

At the 2018 USAPA Nationals we saw what may have been pickleball’s most gutsy shots. It was the Men’s Pro Doubles final and Kyle Yates and Ben Johns were taking on Dave Weinbach and Matt Wright for the Championship. Wright and Weinbach had been dominant throughout the match, in part due to Johns’ poor health. Yates and Johns had managed to claw their way back, but were facing match point. It wasn’t looking good for the youngsters.

To many people in the crowd, it looked like Weinbach and Wright were going to clinch the match. This, we thought, might be the final point. And then Yates did something nobody in the stadium — including his opponents — expected. He hit a shot that he would later call “The dumbest shot in the history of pickleball — if I missed”. Hover on any of the images below for a full breakdown of Kyle Yates and the Lob of Glory. .

Down multiple match points in the finals at the 2018 USAPA Nationals, Kyle Yates hit a perfect down-the-line lob over Matt Wright — one of the game’s best (and tallest) players. It was a gutsy shot that won them the point and led to an amazing come from behind victory. Here’s how he did it.

Down multiple match points in the finals at the 2018 USAPA Nationals, Kyle Yates hit a perfect down-the-line lob over Matt Wright — one of the game’s best (and tallest) players. It was a gutsy shot that won them the point and led to an amazing come from behind victory. Here’s how he did it.

While the lob was the glory shot, it was preceded by many dinks. This is important because it established a pattern where players were accustomed to receiving low and slow balls from their opponents.

While the lob was the glory shot, it was preceded by many dinks. This is important because it established a pattern where players were accustomed to receiving low and slow balls from their opponents.

Yates (black shirt) moves his opponent Dave Weinbach with a good crosscourt. Weinbach is a little off balance so replies with a crosscourt of his own. Compared to down-the-line, crosscourt provides a larger target and lower net which makes it a good place to hit when in trouble. But Weinbach hits a little too wide, moving Yates outside the sideline.

Yates (black shirt) moves his opponent Dave Weinbach with a good crosscourt. Weinbach is a little off balance so replies with a crosscourt of his own. Compared to down-the-line, crosscourt provides a larger target and lower net which makes it a good place to hit when in trouble. But Weinbach hits a little too wide, moving Yates outside the sideline.

With Yates pulled wide, Wright (pink shirt) must be weary of a potential around-the-post drive. Instead, Yates plays a well-disguised topspin lob. Because he is off the court, he has a good angle to play a lob over Wright’s backhand side (avoiding the dangerous forehand smash). Wright appears surprised at the lob and hesitates. Instead of hitting it out of the air, he lets it bounce. He is now in an extremely defensive position and can’t make the drop.

With Yates pulled wide, Wright (pink shirt) must be weary of a potential around-the-post drive. Instead, Yates plays a well-disguised topspin lob. Because he is off the court, he has a good angle to play a lob over Wright’s backhand side (avoiding the dangerous forehand smash). Wright appears surprised at the lob and hesitates. Instead of hitting it out of the air, he lets it bounce. He is now in an extremely defensive position and can’t make the drop.

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